Unit Testing in Laravel

Jacob Mitchell
3 min readApr 5, 2023
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Unit Testing in Laravel

Unit Testing is a software development practice that helps developers to ensure that individual units or components of their code are working as intended. In Laravel, a popular PHP framework, unit testing is a built-in feature that enables developers to test their code in isolation.

In this article, we will explore what unit testing is, why it is important, and how it works in Laravel. We will also provide examples of how to write unit tests in Laravel.

What is Unit Testing?

Unit testing is a software testing technique that involves testing individual units or components of code in isolation. It is a process of verifying the functionality of a piece of code by testing it in isolation from the rest of the system. In unit testing, developers test each component of the code to make sure that it is functioning as expected.

Unit testing is important because it helps to ensure the quality of the code. By testing each component of the code in isolation, developers can catch errors and bugs before they become larger problems. Unit testing also makes it easier to maintain the code, as it is easier to identify and fix issues when they are isolated to a single component.

How Does Unit Testing Work in Laravel?

Laravel provides a built-in testing framework that enables developers to write and run unit tests. The testing framework is based on PHPUnit, a popular unit testing framework for PHP.

To create a unit test in Laravel, developers use the php artisan make:test command. This command creates a new test class in the tests/ directory of the Laravel application. The test class extends the PHPUnit\Framework\TestCase class and includes methods for testing various components of the code.

Here’s an example of a basic unit test in Laravel:

<?php

namespace Tests\Unit;

use Tests\TestCase;

class ExampleTest extends TestCase
{
public function testBasicTest()
{
$this->assertTrue(true);
}
}

This test class is named ExampleTest and includes a single test method named testBasicTest. The assertTrue method is used to assert that a value is true.

To run this test, developers can use the phpunit command. This command will run all of the tests in the tests/ directory of the Laravel application.

Example of Unit Testing in Laravel

Let’s look at an example of how to write a unit test in Laravel. In this example, we will test a method that calculates the total price of an order.

<?php

namespace Tests\Unit;

use Tests\TestCase;
use App\Order;

class OrderTest extends TestCase
{
public function testTotalPrice()
{
$order = new Order;
$order->items = [
['price' => 10],
['price' => 20],
['price' => 30],
];

$this->assertEquals(60, $order->totalPrice());
}
}

In this test, we create a new instance of the Order class and set the items property to an array of items, each with a price value. We then call the totalPrice method of the Order class and use the assertEquals method to assert that the result is equal to the expected value of 60.

This test ensures that the totalPrice method of the Order class is functioning as expected. If there are any errors or bugs in the method, this test will fail, indicating that the developer needs to review and fix the code.

Conclusion

Unit testing is an important part of software development, as it helps to ensure the quality of the code and make it easier to maintain. Laravel provides a built-in testing framework that makes it easy for developers to write and run unit tests. By using this framework, developers can catch errors and bugs early in

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Jacob Mitchell

Software engineer, Technical writer, writing about software development </>